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The KATA's of Goju-Ryu Style


KATA's

BREATHING

SANCHIN

TENSHIO

GOJU RYU

GEKISAI ICHI

GEKISAI NI

SAIFUWA

SHISOCHIN

SANSERU

SESAN

SEPAI

SEIENCHIN

KURURUNFA

SUPARINPE

MEIBUKAN

TENCHI

(HEAVEN EARTH)

SEIRYUN

(Blue Dragon)

BYAKKO

(White Tiger)

SHUJAKKU

(Red Sparrow)

GENBU

(Black Turtle)


  Kata a Japanese word describing detailed patterns of movements practiced either solo or in pairs.[1] Karate kata are executed as a specified series of a variety of moves, with stepping and turning, while attempting to maintain perfect form. The kata is not intended as a literal depiction of a mock fight, but as a display of transition and flow from one posture and movement to another, teaching the student proper form and position, and encouraging them to visualise different scenarios for the use of each motion and technique. Karateka "read" a kata in order to explain the imagined events, a practice known as bunkai. There are various kata, each with many minor variations.

Traditionally, kata are taught in stages. Previously learned kata are repeated to show better technique or power as a student acquires knowledge and experience. It is common for students testing to repeat every kata they have learned but at an improved level of quality. The various styles of karate study different kata, or variations of a common core. Some kata may therefore be known by two names, one in Japanese, the other in Okinawan or Chinese. This is because Gichin Funakoshi, and others, renamed many kata to help Karate spread throughout Japan.